Wednesday, May 14, 2008

new pieces





Cloud and swallow clasp

Crow and sparrow (front view)

(back view)

New waxes from Bob Burkett (both red waxes)

Hard at work making new masters! These pieces are destined to be made in pewter, except for the clasp, which will be cast in either silver or shibuichi. I made this clasp once before, but lost the cloud part during casting and only the bird came out. I'm so glad I finished it finally. I'm planning more clasps, an 's' and maybe another toggle. Hopefully I'll have time to make lots of one of a kind pieces, like my sculptural bezels or some polymer owls. This latest series is inspired by ancient Japanese ojime beads and I'm trying to finish two more by morning. I better put on another pot of coffee!




11 comments:

Lorelei said...

Absolutely Beautiful Cynthia! Of course, the owl is my favorite. Looking forward to the day that these are available for purchase!

Jennifer said...

These are gorgeous! I especially love the little round owl bead and the round insect bead. I tend to love the smaller pieces that can be worked into bracelets. Can't wait to get my hands on these for sure!

Andrew Thornton said...

Oh, I have much love for these pieces! Wonderful.

And you know I love the owl time.

Beth said...

beautiful!

Jeremiah Ketner said...

wow, these look great. They are my favorite pieces so far. I really love the dragonfly one.

heatherwynn said...

super fantastical awesome.
I cant wait =)

Christina said...

Beautiful!

Christina said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jean said...

I think this are so beautiful!

Jean said...

please excuse the typo abve--also--what is the difference between ojime and netsuke? thank you

Cynthia Thornton said...

Hi Jean,
The difference between an ojime and a netsuke is that the purpose of an ojime (usaully bead shaped and a smaller piece) is used as a toggle closure to a box -like inro, used to keep money or medicines. The netsuke is the part tucked in and over an obi/belt to hold the inro and ojime in place (think pouch). These ornate and functional storage devices were used because kimonos don't have pockets.